Real Estate

Estate on the Island of St. Croix Comes With Historic Sugar Mills

Hundreds of years ago, an intrepid builder knew the exact place to put a home on the island of St. Croix.

That residence in what’s now the U.S. Virgin Islands is on the market for $949,000.

The property in Christiansted dates to 1760, when growing sugarcane and processing sugar drove the economy of the tiny Caribbean island just southeast of Puerto Rico.

“It’s perched in a location in the middle of the island and was built there primarily because of the breezes,” says Rhea Abramson with Calabash Real Estate. Abramson and co-listing agent  Honnie Edwards are handling the home’s sale.

A strong and constant breeze was required to turn the sugar mills, the remnants of which remain on the six-acre property.

Aerial view

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Main house exterior

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Sugar mills

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Tunnel entrance

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Tunnel

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Ruins

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Ruins

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“They’re original and made out of stone and coral,” Abramson says of the sugar mills still standing on the property. “There’s also an underground tunnel system. All of those ruin-type-looking things were there in service to the plantation.”

The two windmills haven’t been in service for more than 200 years, but they provide a scenic backdrop for a lot of activity and events.

The property is “used a lot for weddings. It can be an entertainment venue for outdoor parties. The windmills are really there for historical significance,” Abramson says.

“These ruins are unique in St. Croix. I don’t think there are others like it,” she adds. “You’re kind of awe-struck. There’s a feeling almost of ancient Rome in some ways because the ruins are so vast. There’s an almost aqueduct-looking wall that wraps around probably a quarter of the property.”

Main house

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Main house

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Veranda

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Standing out against the earth-colored ruins, is the bright yellow main house. It measures 1,700 square feet and has three bedrooms.

“Whoever was running the plantation back in the day lived in that home,” Abramson explains. “When you look at houses today, you don’t see houses that are only 1,700 square feet with these massive rooms. The living spaces are all very large.”

Dining room

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Living space

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Bedroom

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Kitchen

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The current owner has had the place for about seven years and has restored it with quality craftsmanship and furnishings.

“All the furniture is included. I think that’s super important because a historical buyer is going to be interested in having the house look exactly the way that it looked back then, so the furniture is really important,” says Abramson.

The veranda is also a standout, she notes. “You literally feel like you are in another century when you sit out there. I don’t know how to explain it. It’s just a really large and cool outdoor space with a constant and wonderful breeze blowing. Temperaturewise, you’re perfectly comfortable all the time.”

Outbuilding

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Exterior

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Another building on the property offers two more bedrooms and bathrooms. The current owner uses it for storage.

Born and raised on the island, Abramson says she’s never seen a home like this.

“It would be phenomenal for it to go to somebody who is well-versed in antiquities and loves history, but I also think it’s a perfect home for someone who wants to have an investment property. I think this is a really great vacation rental home because there are people who would want to sleep in a home that was built in the 1700s.”

Aerial view

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Outdoor space

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Outdoor space

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Bedroom

(Soundstage VI)

Bedroom

(Soundstage VI)

Kitchen

(Soundstage VI)

Bedroom

(Soundstage VI)

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